Musée: DANIEL GORDON: ORANGE SUNRISE WITH FLOWERS, FRUIT, AND VESSEL | NAZARIAN / CURCIO

Aundréa Verdi, Musée, April 24, 2024

 
Daniel Gordon's debut exhibition at Nazarian / Curcio, titled "Orange Sunrise With Flowers, Fruit, and Vessels," offers a mesmerizing exploration of the intersection between photography, collage, still-life composition and sculpture. With a keen eye for composition, and a meticulous process that blurs the boundaries between reality and fabrication, Gordon presents a series of captivating works that challenge our perceptions of a photograph. 
 

Large-format color photographs are at the exhibition's core, which creates a cohesive compilation of fauvist still-life arrangements. These photographs draw the viewer into a world where everyday objects are transformed into whimsical, almost surreal compositions. Gordon's process, which involves meticulously crafting three-dimensional scenes out of printed images, imbues his photographs with depth and texture that belies their flat surfaces. Within each piece, the fusion of colors and forms serves as a visual feast and a cognitive puzzle. 

 

Daniel Gordon, Medusa Plant With Artichokes and Root Vegetables. Courtesy of the artist and Nazarian / Curcio.

 

Central to Gordon's practice is his attention to detail. Each element within his compositions, from flowers and fruit to vessels, is carefully selected and arranged to create a visually striking tableau. Yet, despite their meticulous construction, these photographs exude a sense of playfulness and spontaneity. Shadows dance across the vibrant backdrops, objects appear suspended, and colors clash and merge unexpectedly. 

 

What makes Gordon's work special is his approach to the still-life genre. Drawing inspiration from a diverse array of artistic movements, ranging from traditional still-life painting to contemporary product photography, he creates images that are at once timeless and distinctly modern. His use of saturated hues, collage, and graphic outlines pays homage to art history while simultaneously pushing the boundaries of photographic representation.

 

Daniel Gordon, Poppies With Plums and Pomegranate. Courtesy of the artist and Nazarian / Curcio.

 

The use of digital and physical collage techniques further distinguishes his work. By seamlessly integrating printed images with real-world textures, he creates compositions that oscillate between the digital and the tangible. This challenges the viewer's sense of reality and reflects on the increasingly blurred lines between the digital world and our physical experience of space and objects.

 

Aesthetic considerations lead to an interest in still life. The artist himself states that his primary interest lies in creating visual impact. By manipulating each element within his photographs, Gordon invites viewers to question what they see and how they see it. His photographs are not static representations of reality but dynamic explorations of form, color, and perspective.

 

Daniel Gordon, Three Vessels with Orchid and Pink Roses. Courtesy of the artist and Nazarian / Curcio.

 

Complementing the photographic works are a series of sculptural vessels, each crafted from collaged paper. Unlike their two-dimensional counterparts, these vessels exist in physical space, inviting viewers to explore their intricate details and tactile surfaces. They remind us of the materiality of Gordon's art, grounding the ethereal qualities of his artistic compositions.

 

"Orange Sunrise With Flowers, Fruit, and Vessels" is an invitation to ponder on the themes of creation and perception. Through his masterful blending of photography, analog, and digital art methods, the artist not only challenges our perceptions of these mediums but offers a refreshing creative vantage point. For nearly two decades, he has pushed the boundaries of photographic representation, challenging viewers to reconsider their preconceived notions of reality and illusion.

 

On view from April 20th to June 25th, 2024.

Daniel Gordon, Aloe With Onions and Zucchini. Courtesy of the artist and Nazarian / Curcio.

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